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    Michael Odimo

    I have a choices, Michael Oduor Odimo did not; his father died and mother is still alive. She is poor and unable to provide for his basic needs. Michael was very sick, undernourished and very thin when he arrived. The staff at the orphanage immediately put him on a special diet and he had to be dewormed. During early days he was badly behaved and very anti social. With a good diet his health has returned as has his attitude, he has become a sociable lad, working hard at school and the results now speak for themselves. He got accepted into secondary school where he is studying to go to…

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    The Hatch of the Termites

    In recent times I have been sitting down to enjoying meals with large groups, not business lunches or ‘contrived’ dinner parties; but with families and/or a collection of friends, this is surprisingly novel to me. I appreciate good food and recognize that I really do enjoy the relaxed banter. Today there was an enormous hatch of what looked Mayfly; on closer inspection they looked like big flying Ants. However, I was shown they are in fact Termites. Kioni explained that the Termites come out of their holes, fly around for a short time and on landing their wings drop off. The males and females find each other, go off to…

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    New Nanny Goat

    If I was asked what strikes me most here in rural Kenya, it is the real depth of poverty and pain. Watching children devouring a meal as if it may be their last or until whenever, certainly highlights for me that those in poverty really do live their lives “a day at a time”; a mantra that addicts the world over recognize, and indeed has proved to be the best way for me too! When lacking gratitude I reminded myself of heart wrenching sights at which I will never point my camera and hopefully never personally experience. Over the last few weeks it was made apparent to me that the…

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    Diana Otieno

    Diana Anyango Otieno mother died and later her stepmother forced her into an early marriage at the age of 16yrs. The stepmother was charged by the courts and Diana was brought to the orphanage. She is back at school studying to go to university and train to be a nurse.

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    The essential role of Education

    I am seeing, first hand, the struggles and sacrifices parents make in a genuine attempt to better the lives of their children through education here in rural Africa. Once I was part of the same experience, disappointing my own parents in not taking the opportunity that I was given. However, as parents we made sacrifices, educating my own daughter, Georgina; giving her the very best we could provide, as do a great numbers of parents/grandparents. In the UK we have so much more… In Kenya they have far more challenges including share one book among 3 pupils, even in class 8 when taking important exams to go to secondary school.…

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    New vocation as a Teacher

    I am no longer painter, there ended up being more paint on the floor, myself and the children! I have a new vocation, as a Teacher, and have been invited around the local schools to give motivational talks about the real benefits of education, and generally discuss modern life in UK and the developed world, which stimulated lots of questions. The Kenyan Government funds schooling (to a point). For example, the government supplies 8 teachers and parents chip in to fund the other 2 or 3 as necessary. By law, many schools supplement their income by creative means including have a dairy cow or two, growing crops (usually maize), charging…

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    Roger vs Cow

    In the orphanage there are plenty of chickens with chicks running around and two cows. The larger of the two cows is white and black with “horns”! Fortunately I am not frightened of cows so when the big one decided to have a closer look at me to the amazement of staff and kids I patted its head. What nobody bothered to tell me was this cow was aggressive and had a particular dislike of Mgenis’! It was approaching to attack, as it tried to headbutt me (technically -gore me) and having no cape I grabbed both horns for self protection and hung on really tightly. I proceeded to get…

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    Collins Onyango

    Collins Omondi Onyango lost both parents; father died before he was born and his mother was found dead with him feeding on her milk.. Initially he was cared for by his Grandmother, who sacrificed a lot for him. Due to circumstances it was best that he was admitted into the orphanage. On arrival he was very cold and sad, always shivering; after about a month he started to be happy. During this brief period his grandmother died. Collins is dedicated to looking after animals, helping with the cows and goats. He enjoys school and want to study at University. He plans to be a farmer.

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    Equator Water Trick Kenya

    The local transport are buses which are 14 seat Toyoto, the locals call them Matatu. Last Thursday we traveled a very long distance in a Matatu crossing over the Equator. The number of passengers inside was 21 adults inc me, plus a child. I tried the Equator water test. I confirm that I witnessed (with my own eyes, not theory) 10 ft north of the equator when you pull the plug the water goes clockwise and just 10ft south of the equator the water goes anti clockwise. On the Equator, no movement occurs, the water goes straight down the hole. Well… not quite. The trick is ‘how’ you pour water…

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    From Carpenter to Painter

    You may notice I am now working as a painter. My days as carpentry have been cut short; my hammer and saw have been confiscated for health and safety reasons. I was given a Kenyan version of an Italian dish > Spaghetti with cabbage, carrots, tomatoes and potatoes .